Lorna Stevens's work has been exhibited nationally and internationally at galleries, museums and alternative spaces, including the Albany Institute of History and Art,  the Bedford Gallery,  the Boise Art Museum, di Rosa, the Fuller Craft Museum, the Henry Miller Library, the Marin Museum of Contemporary Art, the Nicolaysen Art Museum, the Santa Rosa Museum of Contemporary Art, the Donna Seager Gallery, Southern Exposure, Somarts, and Truman State University.

Her work has been reviewed in The Boston Globe, Artweek and the Marin Independent Journal, featured in The San Francisco Chronicle, The Humanist, Tikkun and West Marin Review and acquired by the Brooklyn Museum, di Rosa, the New York Public Library, the Numakunai Sculpture Garden (Iwate, Japan) and the SF MOMA Research Library.

She received her MFA in Sculpture from Columbia University and has taught at Bridgewater State University, the San Francisco Art Institute and the University of San Francisco. She currently teaches collage and sculpture at City College of San Francisco.

"I’m interested in visually exploring the boundaries of culture and nature. I’m curious about how we behave, both individually and collectively, toward ourselves and in relation to the natural world.

I loosely divide my work into two themes, the Human Condition and the Natural World. The Human Condition explores the unique and inescapable qualities of being human, including the instinct to create, conform, provide and nurture. The Natural World explores those things that have not been substantially altered by human intervention or which persist despite human intervention. In this series, I incorporate images of natural beauty with expressions of environmental concern.

My work is conceptual; my materials and techniques are integral to, and representative of, my subject matter. I use clay and glass to make small fragile objects, organic materials such as branches to speak of the natural world. I make books to tell stories and I alter found objects to make new visual comments. When possible, I combine many of these elements into an installation, often including the work of other artists who share my interests."